Your Qs: Is skipping breakfast bad for you?

You asked, we answered.

OneLife  staff writer

OneLife staff writer

Staff writer

“Are there health risks associated with skipping breakfast?” – Mark, VIC

“Although it seems an innocent enough thing to do, skipping breakfast is actually not good for your health.

Studies have shown that neglecting to eat breakfast can increase your risk of heart disease, as it increases the formation of fatty plaques in your blood vessels.

People who skip the first meal of the day may also have a lower intake of recommended vitamins, minerals and dietary fibre in comparison to those who eat breakfast. This is especially true if compared to a meal containing wholegrains, whole fruit, low-fat milk or ready-to-eat cereals. Breakfast is an ideal opportunity to eat foods that are rich in B vitamins, folate, iron and fibre.

Eating breakfast has also been shown to be important for alertness and concentration. So, if you have a busy day, breakfast is a way to ensure maximum efficiency. If you are running out of time or don’t feel hungry in the morning, you can always drink your breakfast. Having a smoothie that contains low-fat milk, yoghurt and fruit is an easy and nutritious option that you can drink on the run.”

– Lisa Renn, Accredited Practising Dietitian with Body Warfare.

OneLife  staff writer

OneLife staff writers come from a range of backgrounds including health, wellbeing, music, tech, culture and the arts. They spend their time researching the latest data and trends in the health market to deliver up-to-date information, helping everyday Australians live healthier lives. This is general information only and is not intended as medical, health, nutritional or other advice. You should obtain professional advice from a medical or health practitioner in relation to your own personal circumstances. The information in this article is general information only and is not intended as medical, health, nutritional or other advice. You should obtain professional advice from a medical or health practitioner in relation to your own personal circumstances.

Disclaimer:
The information in this article is general information only and is not intended as financial, medical, health, nutritional, tax or other advice. It does not take into account any individual’s personal situation or needs. You should consider obtaining professional advice from a financial adviser and/or tax specialist, or medical or health practitioner, in relation to your own circumstances and before acting on this information.