5 things you might not know about meditation

First up, it’s easier than you think.

OneLife  staff writer

OneLife staff writer

Staff writer

You can actually meditate anywhere.

Seriously. When you’re walking, commuting, dozing or yes, cross-legged on the floor. Meditation is about taking a pause, slowing down and becoming conscious of the body – and you can do that wherever you want.

It can be as simple as coming back to the breath.

Your breath is actually a really useful tool for becoming more mindful. Lost in thought? Bring yourself back to your breathing. The foundation for every meditation session.

Make your #onechange

Download the popular Headspace app for a taste of meditation for just ten minutes every day.

You don’t need to block your thoughts.

Meditation isn’t about emptying your mind. It’s about learning to observe your thoughts, without getting too involved in them.

Don’t worry if you fall asleep.

It’s more common than you think. Don’t chastise yourself, and don’t think you’ve ‘failed’. It happens, don’t dwell on it. Top up on your sleep and try again tomorrow.

The more you practice the easier it will be.

The act of slowing down, observing your thoughts and using your imagination to understand meditation techniques will feel alien at first. But try and practice it on a regular basis and things will start to flow better – plus you’ll feel tangible benefits.

OneLife  staff writer

OneLife staff writers come from a range of backgrounds including health, wellbeing, music, tech, culture and the arts. They spend their time researching the latest data and trends in the health market to deliver up-to-date information, helping everyday Australians live healthier lives. This is general information only and is not intended as medical, health, nutritional or other advice. You should obtain professional advice from a medical or health practitioner in relation to your own personal circumstances. The information in this article is general information only and is not intended as medical, health, nutritional or other advice. You should obtain professional advice from a medical or health practitioner in relation to your own personal circumstances.

Disclaimer:
The information in this article is general information only and is not intended as financial, medical, health, nutritional, tax or other advice. It does not take into account any individual’s personal situation or needs. You should consider obtaining professional advice from a financial adviser and/or tax specialist, or medical or health practitioner, in relation to your own circumstances and before acting on this information.